Tag Archives: Christ

Nothing Matters More Than Jesus

“Then I will tell them plainly, ‘I never knew you. Away from me, you evildoers!’” – Matthew 7:23

 Often, we might think we’re OK. Our culture certainly promotes the “I’m okay, you’re okay” philosophy. The world says you can believe what you want and it will be okay.

But is it true? It is only true if you have a relationship with Jesus Christ. If you don’t, you’re missing out on the most important thing in life!

LifeLifter11

Many people know of Jesus, but they do not know him. Do you really know Jesus?

You might think you have a good relationship with Jesus because you go to church, serve other people, give generously, or engage in some other “religious” activity. Yet, if your heart has not been transformed by Jesus, if nothing internally has changed since you came to know who Jesus is, then perhaps there is no relationship. Perhaps other things are taking the place of Jesus in your life.

Jesus warned that many in the judgment would come expecting a reward for their external religious activities, yet Jesus will tell them, “I never knew you.” He will say this because their hearts are not right with God.

The communion service (Luke 22:14-21) celebrates our life in Christ. It affirms our fellowship with Jesus and it commemorates his sacrifice for us. The bread and the wine symbolize his broken body and shed blood. In a very real sense, when we partake of those symbols, we are sharing in his sacrifice and we are celebrating oneness with him.

Communion points to the cross and the cross points to God’s love for us (John 3:16).

If we have Jesus, we have everything we need. If we don’t, then we have nothing.

We all need to periodically reevaluate our lives and our priorities and place Jesus at the top of every list.

Nothing matters more than our relationship with Jesus.

Advertisements

Celebrating Christmas

At the center of all of the Christmas narratives is the Babe, Jesus Christ, our Emmanuel (“God with us”).

Celebrating Christmas

In the beloved Christmas carol, “O Come Let Us Adore Him,” we sing “Word of the Father, now in flesh appearing.” This harkens to Jesus’ birth (called the Advent or Incarnation) as recorded in the Gospel of John 1:14, “And the Word became flesh and dwelt among us, and we beheld His glory, the glory as of the only begotten of the Father, full of grace and truth.”

With the birth of Jesus, mankind was introduced to God in the flesh, One who could fully empathize with us and who, now, intercedes on our behalf with our Father in heaven.

Our Father? How?

The Word was born a Babe that we might become children of God. John 1:12 explains, “But as many as received Him, to these He gave the right to become children of God, even to those who believe in His name.”

Why would God want to share His life with us?

The most well-known Scripture, John 3:16, tells us, “For God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, that whoever believes in Him should not perish but have everlasting life.”

The apostle John added, “truly our fellowship is with the Father and with His Son Jesus Christ. And these things we write to you that your joy may be full” (1 John 1:3-4).

The exquisitely joyous Christmas season reminds us of our fellowship with God in Christ, a relationship which should fill us with joy. Every day. And, when we meet our Maker, we will fully experience joy forevermore.

John also revealed a little bit about that time, writing, “Beloved, now we are children of God; and it has not yet been revealed what we shall be, but we know that when He is revealed, we shall be like Him, for we shall see Him as He is” (1 John 3:2).

Jesus became a human being so that, ultimately, we could might experience spiritual rebirth and be transformed into His image, to become like Him!

These are just a few things to ponder as we celebrate the day of Jesus’ birth.

Without Christ, there is no Christmas. But with Christ, every day is Christmas.

Dastardly Pilgrims (and Republicans)

(h/t Rush Limbaugh)

Paul Bunyan’s Pilgrim’s Progress is anathema to the secular Left (even though the word “progress” is in its title – I guess they have a different kind of progress in mind).

To many progressives, the Pilgrims were genocidal white supremacists who founded a racist, sexist, and classist patriarchal society which exploited the environment – and, worst of all, they dared to believe and profess Jesus as Savior!

Pilgrims

In other words, the Pilgrims were the Republicans and Religious Right of their times. (Yes, those dastardly Pilgrims are still at it hundreds of years later.)

The Left loves the holiday for the parties and parades (who doesn’t love a good time), though it may decry the consumerism and materialism of the holiday. But its portrayal of the Pilgrims is almost uniformly a critical caricature based upon its ideology, not on facts or history.

Thanksgiving is all about giving thanksto God!

(The Obama administration and the Left wants us to talk about global warming, gun control, racial discrimination and the like over Thanksgiving! The Left also contends that Syrian refugees are just like the Pilgrims! No, they aren’t. They are fleeing war and poverty, not religious persecution.)

The Pilgrims and Puritans were people of faith (Christian) who sought to do God’s will in the New World. The first Thanksgiving was a feast in honor of God for His Providence upon them. Indeed, America’s subsequent Founding Fathers were largely believing Christians who lived in a culture that was biblically-oriented. The secular Left would have you think otherwise.

Quotes from Pilgrim’s Progress

The Left hates the book, Pilgrim’s Progress, because it points to The Good Book – the Bible.

Pilgrim’s Progress is replete with faith claims which today rile the secular Left and atheists. Christians recognize that they are pilgrims in this life and profess a faith in the one true God – something which runs counter to this pluralistic world in which we live. True progress – the progress of Pilgrims – is found in following God and not progressive ideology.

Bunyan expressed a changed life in Christ: “My name is now Christian, but my name used to be Graceless.”

Bunyan denounced the false human philosophies of this world: “Mr. Worldly-Wiseman is not an ancient relic of the past. He is everywhere today, disguising his heresy and error by proclaiming the gospel of contentment and peace achieved by self-satisfaction and works. If he mentions Christ, it is not as the Savior who took our place, but as a good example of an exemplary life. Do we need a good example to rescue us, or do we need a Savior?”

Bunyan professed a dependence upon the omniscience of God: “What God says is best, is best, though all the men in the world are against it.”

Bunyan proclaimed an allegiance to his Savior: “I have given Him my faith, and sworn my allegiance to Him; how, then, can I go back from this, and not be hanged as a traitor?”

Bunyan asserted a certain hope for the future: “I seek a place that can never be destroyed, one that is pure, and that fadeth not away, and it is laid up in heaven, and safe there, to be given, at the time appointed, to them that seek it with all their heart. Read it so, if you will, in my book.”

Bunyan championed the truth and efficacy of God’s Word: “Not that the heart can be good without knowledge, for without knowledge the heart is empty. But there are two kinds of knowledge: the first is alone in its bare speculation of things, and the second is accompanied by the grace of faith and love, which causes a man to do the will of God from the heart.”

Bunyan extolled the God of the Bible: “Is there anything more worthy of our tongues and mouths than to speak of the things of God and Heaven?”

Bunyan pointed people to the cross of Christ: “God’s grace is the most incredible and insurmountable truth ever to be revealed to the human heart, which is why God has given us His Holy Spirit to superintend the process of more fully revealing the majesty of the work done on our behalf by our Savior. He teaches us to first cling to, and then enables us to adore with the faith He so graciously supplies, the mercy of God. This mercy has its cause and effect in the work of Jesus on the cross.”

Bunyan exhorted the lost and hopeless to turn to God: “Wake up, see your own wretchedness, and fly to the Lord Jesus. He is the righteousness of God, for He Himself is God. Only by believing in His righteousness will you be delivered from condemnation.”

Bunyan praised the superiority of truth: “For to speak the truth, there are but few that care thus to spend their time, but choose rather to be speaking of things to no profit.”

My fellow Americans – and all those throughout the world reading this – I exhort you to heed the wise counsel of Paul Bunyan and – instead of following the White House’s advice to discuss climate change – look to our Creator and praise Him for all that He has wrought in His creation and in our lives.

Praise be to God!