King’s Dream Realized (sort of)

Americans are again celebrating Martin Luther King Day in honor of the great civil rights leader, the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., yet recent polls show a growing number of Americans believe that race relations are worse now than they were prior to the Obama presidency.

King famously offered a challenge and a prediction, proclaiming, “I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character.”

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King’s dream has, in large measure, been realized. Americans today do not view race as they did fifty years ago. Indeed, people of all races have the freedom to do what they want to do and be what they want to be unhindered by their race. In that sense, race does not matter.

Yet, at the same time, for some people race is all that matters.

Racial Hoaxes

At one time – for a very long time – white racism kept blacks down. But, though small pockets of white racism may still exist, they have been marginalized and emasculated. However, black racism has been elevated, enabled, and empowered by the likes of Al Sharpton, Jesse Jackson, Eric Holder, Barack Obama, and one of the current president’s mentors, Jeremiah Wright.

The award-winning movie, The Butler, fabricated racial hoaxes to promote a racial narrative of black victimization. Perhaps the most memorable and heartbreaking scene – Cecil Gaines as a young child witnesses his mother’s rape and father’s murder by a white landowner – never happened! It was fabricated to stir up feelings of horror which would continue throughout the film (which is promoted as a biography).

Race hustlers, like those listed above, divide America by race as they promote a false racial narrative of white supremacy and black victimology. For several decades, these hucksters have exploited the very people they profess to help.

Ironically, the help they offer is ever-greater intrusion of the federal government into the lives of every American when it is in fact the government itself which is the cause of so much of dysfunction which plagues certain (primarily urban) black communities.

Johnson’s Great Society has been a failure. The welfare state has fared poorly among those it “serves.” The consequences of the Nanny State include the decimation of the black nuclear family, dependency on government, and fostering of both a sense of being a victim and a sense of entitlement to redress that alleged victimization.

The Civil Rights Movement of the Sixties was successful in securing legal and cultural reform. American attitudes and mores were radically altered within a generation. But that movement was later hijacked by many of its leaders into something Rev. King would repudiate.

The race hustlers seek their own profit while enabling their constituency to remain shackled to government dependency and cultural poverty. And, as a direct consequence of their of their self-promoting propaganda, their instigate riots, arson, mayhem, and murder.

Rev. King’s Wisdom

Actor Morgan Freeman expressed it well: “Dr. Martin Luther King is not a black hero. He is an American hero.”

Let us hearken to the words of this America hero. As we do, compare his goals and his way of achieving those goals with that of many leaders of the current civil rights movement. King was inspirational and uplifting, bringing out the best in people. His love, courage, optimism, and God-centered purpose elevated people and public discourse.

“Peace is not merely a distant goal that we seek, but a means by which we arrive at that goal.”

“Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that.”

“I have decided to stick with love. Hate is too great a burden to bear.”

“Forgiveness is not an occasional act, it is a constant attitude.”

“When evil men plot, good men plan. When evil men burn and bomb, good men must build and bind. When evil men shout ugly words of hatred, good men must commit themselves to the glories of love.”

In contrast, Al Sharpton et. al., declare blacks to be continuing victims and not overcomers, and they proffer a path of destruction will leads to dystopia.

In his last speech, Rev. King inspired each of us, saying:

“Like anybody, I would like to live – a long life; longevity has its place. But I’m not concerned about that now. I just want to do God’s will. And He’s allowed me to go up to the mountain. And I’ve looked over. And I’ve seen the Promised Land. I may not get there with you. But I want you to know tonight, that we, as a people, will get to the Promised Land. So I’m happy, tonight. I’m not worried about anything. I’m not fearing any man. Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord.”

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